Friday, 13 January 2012

Sarah Kay

Sarah Kay, a poet, has performed at TED. Here is the video;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0snNB1yS3IE

I found it very inspirational and I hope you will too especially the first four minutes of the video.
Love, Tereza

Intresting Facts About English

I was thinking about what to put on this ENGLISH BLOG. I decided most of my previous posts, as interesting and funny as they were to me, it was not very related to English, except my previous post about anagrams.

So I went to my good friend Google for some suggestions. I decided i wanted to know about intresting facts about the English language. I came upon this Site:

http://www.englishclub.com/interesting-facts/index.htm

Some things were interesting some as not, but still it was a fun quick read.

My Favorite Facts Were.

Only two English words in current use end in "-gry". They are "angry" and "hungry".

The word "bookkeeper" is the only unhyphenated English word with 3 consecutive repeated letters. Words such as "cross-section" and "bee-eater" normally require a hyphen to be readily readable.

More English words begin with the letter "s" than with any other letter.

The word "uncopyrightable" is the longest English word in normal use that contains no letter more than once.

A sentence that contains all 26 letters of the alphabet is called a "pangram".

The following sentence contains all 26 letters of the alphabet: "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog." This sentence is often used to test typewriters or keyboards.

The dot over the letter "i" and the letter "j" is called a "superscript dot".

The shortest complete sentence in English is the following. "I am."

The longest English word without a true vowel (a, e, i, o or u) is "rhythm".

There are only 4 English words in common use ending in "-dous": hazardous, horrendous, stupendous, and tremendous.

We can find 10 words in the 7-letter word "therein" without rearranging any of its letters: the, there, he, in, rein, her, here, ere, therein, herein.

The following sentence contains 7 identical words in a row and still makes sense. "It is true for all that that that that that that that refers to is not the same that that that that refers to." (= It is true for all that, that that "that" which that "that" refers to is not the same "that" which that "that" refers to.)

Okay, So all of it was pretty interesting.

Love, Tilly.

Tuesday, 10 January 2012

Anagrams

an·a·gram

A word, phrase, or name formed by rearranging the letters of another, such as cinema, formed from iceman.

I came upon anagrams when i was looking for some funny English jokes. They are not really jokes, but ridiculously cool.

Dormitory == Dirty Room

Slot Machines == Cash Lost in 'em

Snooze Alarms == Alas! No More Z's

A Decimal Point == I'm a Dot in Place

Eleven plus two == Twelve plus one

I found these really funny. 

If you want to look at more of them: http://www.ahajokes.com/eng001.html

Love, Tilly.